My New Year’s Eve Plans

cool-Netflix-Marathon-TV-running

 

What? I get up at the butt crack of dawn people! I will not be partying hard or any other way.  I’ll probably watch the rest of the Arrow episodes I have waiting.  On second thought maybe not, there are way more than I can watch in an evening, especially after getting up so early. But I think I can manage three or four before I fall asleep.  And there’s still at least half a bottle of Jack’s honey whiskey so there’s that.

Happy New Year everyone!  May you be blessed with good health and whatever makes you happy in 2016!

The Power of the Pedicure

I didn’t have my first pedicure till I was 50 55*. I’ll pause for a moment to let that sink in. To my male readers (and perhaps some of the female ones) this statement alone will be meaningless. Allow me expound.

Yesterday I took my best friend for a pedicure for her birthday. This morning I’m admiring my cheerful, polished toes. I emphasize polished because I mean it both literally and descriptively. Polished with bright red-gold enamel and as in “finished” or “put together”.

There’s a sense of confidence isn’t there when we feel polished or put together? I look at my toes and feel feminine while also feeling in control. I don’t often feel in control. It is a good feeling.

There is power in that feeling. Back to the fact I didn’t have my first pedicure till I was 50 55. While sitting here admiring my toes and recognizing their power, it occurred to me, what if I had had regular pedicures beginning in my 20s or 30s when I was so much more out of control? How would that power have impacted me then? Would my life look even a little different now if I had felt more powerful, more in control, more confident then?

Questions I’ll never have an answer for I know. But I think I may have to introduce my granddaughters to the power of the pedicure soon.

*Wishful thinking I guess but I realize now it was only four years ago, not nine.

How about a toast?

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Merry Christmas from Janey!  You’re on your own for libations. I don’t share well.

Janey out.

*Well shit. No matter what I do I can’t get the damn glass in the right configuration. And I swear that’s my first glass! So much for a Smart Phone!

What I’m reading now

In case you’re interested –

Body & Soul by Frank Conroy.

book cover

From the back cover:

“In the dim light of a basement apartment, six-year-old Claude Rawlings sits at an old white piano, picking out the sounds he has heard on the radio and shutting out the reality of his lonely world.”

Imagine a little boy left alone while his mother goes off to drive a taxi in New York in the 1940s.  Can you put yourself in his place?  Claude spends a lot of time watching people walk back and forth on the sidewalk outside the apartment window.  All he can see is their legs and shoes, but at least it’s something to do.

“An old woman with thin calves, a kid in sneakers, men in wingtips, women in high heels…. If anyone paused he could see detail – straps, eyelets, a worn heel, or cracked leather with the sock showing through – but it was the movement that he liked, the passing parade of color and motion.”

Claude eventually discovers the piano that is stored in the back room where he sleeps.  As the back cover blurb mentions, he begins to copy the music he hears on the radio, filling the long hours his mother is gone.

As novels go, this one starts slow but builds into a very enjoyable read.  Claude is a likeable, genuine character, as is Mr. Weisfeld, a music store proprietor who takes Claude under his wing.  One of my favorite characters though is Al, a furnace man at a ritzy New York apartment building where Claude goes to collect bottles for the refund.  Al’s character develops slowly, almost deceptively.  When he appeared to be leading Claude astray I wasn’t sure I was going to like him.  But Conroy redeems him in my eyes later on and one of my favorite quotes from the book is his.

Al and Claude’s mother, Emma have become friends and the three of them are having dinner when Claude learns that Al’s been unjustly fired.  Claude is accustomed to is mother’s passionate outbursts and overreactions so he is surprised at Al’s calm demeanor.

“I mean, you’re not even angry.  That’s terrible what they did.  It’s outrageous.”

“I’m angry.  I just don’t give in to it.”  He sipped his tea and then put it down.  “Stuff happens all the time.  What’d you call it?  Outrageous.  Outrageous stuff make you so mad you can just burn yourself up with it.  You got to decide if the mad runs you, or you run the mad.”

How wise is that?

I’m not doing the book justice with this post, but it’s worth your time if you like character studies.  I should have finished it long ago but I’m lingering over it, savoring it.  I don’t want it to end.

Oh, and Merry Christmas if you swing that way.

 

I’m a terrible person

We stopped at 7-11 for coffee on the way to the train station this morning. No, 7-11 coffee doesn’t make me a terrible person. That only makes me frugal, or cheap, if you want to be picky.

Getting coffee at 7-11 removes the barista, meaning I get to “doctor” our drinks. Here comes the terrible part people, pay attention. While stirring hazelnut creamers into JD’s cup this morning Janey wondered briefly what she could stir into that cup to put him out of his misery.

See? Terrible. (Shudders)